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Tweaking WordPress.com

My stats sparkline script has been updated to v1.1.0! This version adds support for custom domains.

If you have auto-update enabled for the script, you should receive the update soon. Otherwise, you can force an update check for the script in your extension or head over to Greasy Fork and install it manually.

If you own a custom domain, you have an extra step to do, again because of technical limitations. By default, the script won’t run on your custom domain because it doesn’t know about it. To fix that, find the script in your user scripts extension (Greasemonkey, Tampermonkey, etc.), go to the script’s options and add the following as a user include, where example.com is your custom domain:

https://example.com/*

If your extension doesn’t support user includes, you will have to edit the script manually, although doing this means you won’t get automatic updates and you will have to do this every time you update. If you need to this, add the following line after the existing @include line:

// @include https://example.com/*

A big shout-out goes to Dennis for alerting me of the bug and helping me test! This release couldn’t have happened without him.

If you’d like to read about the technical details of the update, continue reading. Otherwise, if you have any questions or experience any issues, please leave a comment. Happy blogging!

Technical details →

The staff at WordPress.com are at it again, removing useful features for the sake of consistency with the “unified experience” vision. This time, it’s the stats sparkline in the admin bar that was introduced in 2011. It still lives on hidden in the sidebar that appears when you click “My Sites” in the admin bar, but its usefulness is greatly reduced because it’s hidden in the sidebar and not immediately visible in the admin bar.

This was unacceptable, of course, so I wrote a script to bring it back. Unfortunately, because of certain technical limitations, this script can only run on URLs that have wordpress.com in the domain part. If you want to add support for your custom domain, you will have to extend the script’s include directives. You can add one in the script’s options in your extension. If your extension doesn’t support adding custom includes, you can add it yourself by adding a custom @include line to the script, but you won’t be able to receive automatic updates.

The sparkline restored to the admin bar

The sparkline is restored

If you’ve already installed one of my previous scripts, you’ll know how easy it is to install this one. If installing user scripts is new to you, don’t worry; it’s very simple. If you don’t already have one, install a browser extension that allows you to run user scripts. Then, install the script from Greasy Fork.

If you have any questions or experience any issues, please leave a comment.

You don’t need to know how the script works to use it, but if you’d like to know the technical details, read on. The source code is available on GitHub.

Happy blogging!

Technical details →

v2.1.0 of my classic stats redirect script has been released! As I had mentioned in my previous release post, v2.1 of this script features support for redirecting when there is no blog domain in the URL. This is the case for /stats, /stats/insights, /stats/day, and the others stats types. Unfortunately, due to the nature of the solution, the page must load first before you are redirected. Fortunately, though, this probably isn’t a very common case.

The script was updated earlier today, so you may have already received the update if you have auto-updating enabled for the script. Otherwise, you can install the new version manually from Greasy Fork. Leave a comment if you experience any issues or have any questions.

Technical details follow.
Read More

Version 2.0.0 of my classic stats redirect script is out! I had actually released it on Thursday, but I didn’t get a chance to write this post until now. If you have auto-updating enabled for the script, which is the default, you should have already received the update. Otherwise, you can head over to Greasy Fork to install it manually. This new version redirects instead to the classic dashboard stats page. Thanks goes to PiedType for alerting me of the problem and to Dennis for the idea for the solution.

If you would prefer to use the new stats page and would like to use your screen space a little more, you can install my stylesheet that does that.

If you’d like to learn more about how the script works, keep reading. Otherwise, you can stop here and enjoy your classic stats! Leave a comment if you have any trouble setting it up or if you have any questions.

Insights and technical info →

WordPress.com’s new editor was updated on November 16 and it broke redirecting for private and Jetpack-enabled blogs. Specifically, the fallback link to the old editor was removed, so the script could not scrape it and redirect to it.

Those of you who are using the script already and have automatic updates enabled (it’s probably enabled by default) should get an update to v1.4.0 soon. Otherwise, head over to Greasy Fork and install the script manually.

As a result of the update, redirection for Jetpack-enabled blogs whose site root and installation root differ fails again. Until someone figures out how to hijack the API proxy that the editor uses, this will stay broken.

Please report any issues you come across and I will try to fix them as soon as possible.

Technical details →

I’ve finally finished that page with all the workarounds for getting back to the WordPress.com classic editor!
http://git.io/wpcom-restore-classic-ed

I made an external page instead of a blog post because of limitations imposed on WordPress.com (understandably for security concerns). The page could look a little nicer, but at least the content is there.